• Message from James Clarke

    "South Africa's Best Humour Columnist"

    - SA's Comedy Awards September 2008

    “South Africa’s funniest columnist.”

    - Financial Mail

    WELCOME TO MY BLOG

    The name is Clarke. James Clarke. I have been told by people who know their way around the electronic world with its iPads, USBs, processors, modems, 500 gb hard drives, Blackberries and microwave ovens, that as a writer I have to have a blogsite. Otherwise, I am told, it is like passing oneself off as a CEO and you haven’t a leather chair that tilts back.

    Yet after four years of having a blogsite I still don’t really understand what it is or how it helps sell my books which is my major concern in life apart from not stepping on cracks when walking on the pavement.

    I am also told that on a blogsite it is customary to refer to oneself in the third person. This enables one to grossly exaggerate ones attainments without appearing to have done so personally.

    Not being one to buck the system...

    London-born James Clarke is your average tall, dark, handsome fellow who writes books – fiction and non-fiction. As a humorist he has been compared with PG Wodehouse and James Thurber. (The Daily Bugle in Des Moines said “compared with the works of PG Wodehouse and James Thurber, Clarke’s writing isn’t worth a row of beans”.)

    He long ago settled in South Africa where he became a mover and a shaker in the world of the environmental sciences. As a youth, being a mover and a shaker, had made it impossible for him to follow in his father’s footsteps as a bottler in a nitro-glycerine plant. Hence he turned to journalism.

    But around the time he retired a few years ago he found a new pursuit as a humorist. He wrote a daily humour column in the Johannesburg Star (now syndicated) and began turning out books of humour in the UK and South Africa.

    Clarke very recently moved boldly into the electronic publishing world. It was, he said afterwards, like a non-swimmer diving into a pool without first testing its depth.

    In November 2011 he re-issued his latest book of humour, “Blazing Saddles”, as an Amazon Kindle e-book under the title “Blazing Bicycle Saddles”. For a mere US$4.99 you can download a copy of this seminal cycling book in a matter of seconds by clicking here ....


    ooo

    He did this with the full realisation that he is totally at sea in the electronic world with its telephones that take movies and receive faxes and sports results.

    The original edition of “Blazing Saddles”, published by Jonathan Ball, has been out of print for two years. It reveals the true story of how six retired men – five of them journalists – year after year set out (intrepidly) from the African continent on a series of exploratory expeditions cycling into “Darkest Europe” to bring back to the people of Africa tales of its funny natives.

    Clarke will also shortly be publishing, via Amazon.com, another of his action-packed autobiographical books – this time an account of his Second World War exploits as L*E*A*D*E*R of the Yellow Six Patrol of the 1st Streetly Boy Scouts in the English Midlands. He recounts the patrol’s ceaseless campaign to defeat Adolf Hitler’s plan to invade England.

    You can read about “The Yellow Six” within this blogsite.

    Clarke, apart from moving and shaking, is a travel writer and proud father of two highly successful daughters – one a biologist and the other an environmental impact analyst. He and his wife, Lenka, live north of Johannesburg.

The most beautiful site in Tuscany – in fact anywhere

(An extract from “Blazing Bicycle Saddles” – the story of how a bunch of retired daily newspaper editors from Africa decide to explore “Darkest Europe” and bring back to Africa stories of the funny natives there.)

cycling

I’m sure it was sheer fatigue that led to our confusion after landing in Rome and making our way to Tuscany. At the central railway station, considering we were all seasoned travellers, we had the devil’s own job finding the train to Florence where we were due to change for Certaldo, the starting point of our cycle ride across Italy. The Italian rail system does not make things easy for foreigners. In fact, we were often left with the impression that the Italians actively dislike visitors and would much rather would-be tourists stayed home and posted their money to them.

While I stayed with the luggage the other five set off in different directions on intelligence-gathering missions. One found the train to Florence was leaving from platform 1, two said it was from platform 4 and a fourth was told platform 9. As two concurred on platform 4 that is where we went. There we found an Italian family who assured us we were on the right platform and pointed to the indicator screen which read “Firenze” (It’s difficult to say why the Italians get the spelling so wrong.) It worried us, though that there were so few people yet the train was imminent. With only five minutes to go the family suddenly panicked and ran off into the distance shouting “Sette!” (Seven!) We hurtled along in their wake and were just in time to leap aboard the train. Thank goodness, I thought, that Peter who had just joined our team and at 58 was by far the youngest, had reduced the team’s average age (seventy one) to well below seventy, because we could never normally have run that fast with our luggage.

The train sped through countryside that was bathed in autumn sunshine and it seemed that every other hill wore a crown in the shape of a medieval citadel. As the express quietly hummed along and the blue-grey olive groves and lush vineyards slid past, some of us dozed off.

We reached Certaldo late in the afternoon and stepped out of the station, sweaty and unshaven after 24 hours of travelling by air from Johannesburg and on trains. We surveyed the town’s steep Via San Giugno leading up to the base of the centuries-old fortified upper town – Certaldo Alto where our hotel was situated at the summit. Although there is a funicular it meant a 500 m walk to get to it so we hired two taxis for the ascent through the maze of narrow cobbled streets to the very summit itself.

After booking into the 400-year-old Hotel Vicario Osteria we were supposed to turn left out of the front door and walk down the street to our rooms in a more modern 300-year-old annex. But something made us turn right. Call it a sixth sense if you like but we did it in perfect unison with our instinctive finch-like flocking motion. In retrospect it was probably because there was no sign reading “caffé” if we’d turned left and we were seriously dehydrated. Around the corner we saw – and I will try not to be too sentimental about it – one of the most beautiful sights in Tuscany. Nay, in the whole of Europe at the time. We found ourselves in a thirteenth-century piazza and there, on an iron table in a shady corner, a shaft of sunshine was beaming down on an object of singular beauty – a large glass of golden beer. We flopped into chairs and ordered one each – our first Italian draft birra. It came in a litre-sized mug and a minute or two later we were staring into our empty glasses. Well, at least, I was.

Later, too tired to change the clothes we had worn overnight and having decided on an early night, we wandered down a steep and narrow alley to a delightful restaurant where we sat on a terrace with a panoramic view of Upper Tuscany. In the valley below were Roman walls and tiled roofs glowing in the setting sun. Far to the south, high on a hill was a citadel, toothier with medieval towers than any we’d seen up to now – San Gimignano, our destination the day after tomorrow.

Some of us ordered wild boar for dinner. Remembering how the Ancient Romans had tried to domesticate Africa’s guineafowl I ordered that. It was excellent. Everything was excellent and we joined in some banter with an English family at the next table.

It was a clear, warm evening and, as the sun slid below the hills the lights of distant villages competed with the stars. We raised our glasses to Italy and toasted a lot of other things besides. Even our wives again. Alan suggested we send them flowers on the morrow. The silence that followed was broken by Rex who said with his usual gravity, “Never do anything that might vaguely suggest to those at home that we might be feeling even a tiny bit guilty about being here without them.” We solemnly raised our glasses to our treasurer’s unquestionable wisdom.

We agreed that as we had the whole of the next day to spare we would get a train back to Florence and spend the day there.

 

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